Piston and Rotary Screw Compressors Compared [Infographic]

By: Kaeser Compressors, Inc.

Are you considering buying a new compressor and debating between a piston and a rotary screw? Here’s a quick infographic with a side-by-side comparison. If you’d like more information, check out Michael Camber’s blog post on this same topic. Continue reading “Piston and Rotary Screw Compressors Compared [Infographic]”

The Trouble with Modulating Compressors

By: Michael Camber

Many plants are still running modulating compressors. For many decades, they were the go-to design choice for compressed air systems. Now they’ve mainly been relegated to warming the bench, mostly due to the rise of variable frequency drive (VFD) compressors. While still numerous, they pose problems—especially in the areas of controls and efficiency. If you have multiple modulation control units in your plant, you just might have the makings of an energy savings jackpot. Continue reading “The Trouble with Modulating Compressors”

Zen and the Art of Compressor Maintenance

By: Werner Rauer

I’ve never understood the reluctance to take care of routine compressor maintenance. They’ll say compressed air is absolutely critical for their plant and that their processes can’t function without it. But, in the next breath admit they don’t regularly change the oil or check the air filters on their compressor. Truthfully, regular care and maintenance is one of the best ways to bring a little Zen to your compressed air system. It can reduce unscheduled downtime and keep your system running as efficiently as possible. Here are five tips on what to consider when putting together a maintenance plan for your plant. Continue reading “Zen and the Art of Compressor Maintenance”

Some Like It Hot…Your Compressor Room Doesn’t

By: Neil Mehltretter

Many facilities have issues with compressor room temperature regulation. This is due in large part to poor planning. Too often the compressor room is the last part of the facility considered when building a new plant or retrofitting an old one. As a result, the compressed air system is installed wherever there is room left—cramped spaces, alongside boilers or other equipment. Most compressed air systems have standard temperature ratings between 40 oF and 115 oF. However, considering that refrigerated dryers and heated desiccant dryers have correction factors when inlet temperatures rise above or fall below 100 oF, careful consideration should be taken into account for ambient conditions for both summer and winter. Continue reading “Some Like It Hot…Your Compressor Room Doesn’t”